The Italianized Blonde

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american

culture

No Means No: No Vuol Dire No

The sun was starting to go down, illuminating the tops of the buildings with a gold veil. Cars rushed by and scooters swerved between them. Everyone was ready to be home. I met my husband at the end of our street as we both returned from long days at work. I smiled as soon as I saw Lorenzo, but  ...

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travel

Rome-ing! (top 3 favorites in Rome)

In February of 2015, in fact on valentine’s day, I took my one giant suitcase filled with my life, hopped on the train from Puglia and moved to Rome! Rome turned into a beautiful, fun, young, artsy and party filled home. I made amazing friends, which was fairly easy as the city is full of  ...

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travel

Florence, Italy

Every new city I visit in Italy gives me a new and improved flavor of Italian living. A better grasp of culture, language, and even a small glimpse of what daily life might look like for a local. For me, a place could be absolutely breathtaking and full of life and constant stimulation, but if  ...

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culture

The Art of Being Blonde in Italy

When I first moved to Italy, I lived in the south. Everyone was tan, olive skinned, with dark eyes, and generally almost black hair. I am about as far polar opposite as one can be from that. Before coming to Italy I didn’t give much consideration to my hair color. I am naturally REALLY blonde.  ...

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lifestyle

The Italianized Blonde Q&A

  Why did you start a blog? Abby: I had wanted to start a blog for a really long time, because I think that writing is a great way to self reflect and save memories. So, as soon as I moved to Italy I started writing. However, I know to stay accountable I need to work with someone else, and  ...

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lifestyle

Meeting Em and Starting TIB

When I moved to Turin to be with my husband (then boyfriend) I struggle  to find friends. My life was great: I had a job I liked, I met nice people, and I had (and fortunately continue to have) an amazing, patient, loving husband. Yet, I still felt a bit empty. I couldn’t find my people. You  ...

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